Losing Blue by Corona: the cans that showed how polluted Mexico’s beaches are

Corona has a huge affinity with Mexican beaches, so much that the design of the cans is inspired by a beach sunset. The blue represents the ocean, the yellow the sun, and the white the sky. Today, there is less sea to enjoy because of the growing pollution. Because of that, Corona’s packaging got an update.

For many years, the beer brand has been part of the big problem with plastic pollution: Every year, the beverage industry uses 17 million tons of plastic to package their drinks – and much of that plastic ends up polluting the environment. 

Therefore, Corona teamed up with the Australian and Mexican offices of agency Leo Burnett and created the concept “Losing Blue”. The Corona cans have changed the design for the first time in 100 years to show how polluted Mexican beaches are.

The agency collected data about pollution from every beach in Mexico and made it visible in the packaging. Each can comes with a specific beach name and the beach’s level of contamination. The more polluted water on the beach, the less blue colour in the cans. 

Furthermore, Corona’s goal is to eliminate all plastic from their packaging, and do it in a scalable way. With help from Leo Burnett “Fit Packs” were created. Fit Packs is a stackable design of cans that can screw together without using any additional materials. 

Fit Packs is part of Corona’s continued effort to make a positive impact on life below water and oblige this UN Sustainable Development Goal. The innovative idea is cost-effective and can be easily scaled out to markets worldwide. Corona also wants other beverage companies to try making the Fit Packs concept, so the brand made its design available for the entire industry.

The new can design, which was on the 2019 Cannes Innovation Lions shortlist, is being run on a pilot basis in Mexico but the goal is to expand it to all the countries in the world where Corona is available.

621
SHARES
WRITTEN BY:

Goodvertising

Goodvertising is a book, but equally a movement to unlock the world-bettering power of brands